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May 28th, 2007, 08:07 AM   #21
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boheme,

If you have an 01 you have the shock with the long tapered needle. (the needle profiles have been changing yearly it seems like) With this in mind, you will need a straight rate spring, not the progressive that the bike came with. This is due to the very progressive nature of the valving caused by the long thin needle found on the 01's. In other words, as the rear suspension is compressing the shaft is encountering a larger and larger diameter needle, thereby shutting down the by pass for the oil through the shaft. At the same time the spring is becoming more and more stiff due to it's rising rate. If memory serves........... My stock shock on my 01 501 had too much compression damping (due to the rising rate spring and the valving) and too little rebound damping. Which resulted in the PA TOOIE effect. Which means getting spit off. After re-springing the bike, and re-vlaving the bike became very stable.

On my 01 501 I ran the following set up for the desert riding I do. Which by the way is not just flat & fast. 8.4KG rear spring, and 44KG front springs. And had ths suspension valved by a competent suspension man. I must respectfully disagree with Viking about having your suspension re-valved. Along with selecting the proper springs, re-valving your suspension is very important.

After re-reading this article, which I see that I posted to some time ago I have a couple of other suggestions.

I have found that 33-35 mm of static sag is really where you want to be. If with this amount of static sag you are outside of the 3 & 1/2" to 4" of rider sag there is a good chance you are going to need another spring. There is no way around it, period. Along the same lines, if the rear spring is changed then the front's will also need to be changed to maintain balance. So, check this out first before visiting the suspension shop. There is also another point to consider regarding springs, especially your shock spring. There is a certain range of spring pre load that is acceptable. It's usually 4-6mm's I believe. Mine is set at 5mm. When I got my suspension back from my tuner, I bolted them on the bike and guess what? The static sag was exactly 33mm!! So, outside of checking static and rider sag, check this. Put the bike on a stand and measure the compressed or pre-loaded lenght of the spring, then back off the adjuster so that the spring is loose and re measure and the exact same spot. Compared with your static and race sag measurements, I think you will find this rather interesting.

I don't know how fast you ride, or how many hours you ride. But experiece has taught me that 30 to 40 hours is the max you want to go before servicing your suspension fluid. Don't try and fool yourself here. Look at it this way, you change your motor oil at the suggested amount of hours or less right? Suspesion oil is no different, in fact your shock oil can reach temps approaching 400 degree's if ridden hard. The oil is asked to not only try and maintain a certain viscosity, to maintain the same damping charachteristis, but also provide lubrication as well. So don't skimp on the oil changes.

Another lesson just learned. The rebound adjuster on our shocks is a bit different than that of the KTM's. It has to be since the KTM's use a clevis for the lower mount, and our bikes use and eye. Point is, that little adjuster has a very smalll screw that water will eventually creep into and corrode. What you will notice when this happens is that the adjuster will seem like it now only has 10 clicks or so of adjustment, instead of 32. If you try and force it to adjust more it will break free, and will also break said small screw, thereby ruining it. And by ruining it I mean that you will be purchasing a new shock to the tune of $1100 usd. BEAUSE, they don't sell these parts seperately, you have to buy the whole shock. When you get your shock serviced, this piece should be dis-assembled and cleaned along with the rest of the shock to prevent this from happening.

As far as the clickers go: Your shock only has the low speed compression and rebound clickers, the forks the same. You would be well served to upgrade your forks comprssion and rebound adjuster valves to the 02 models as they flowed more oil. After having my susupension serviced by Clean racing, I have found that overall the suspension works best where he had set the clickers. I have tried playing with them a bit, a few clicks this way or that, and have always come back to the setting he gave me. That's what you're paying for when you have someone who knows what he's doing set up your suspension.
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July 31st, 2007, 07:29 PM   #22
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RE: Re: A guide to basic suspension tuning

Hi, I'm new to the Husaberg site and hope someone will be able to help. I'm a former desert racer (expert div.) in Southern California and am considering buying a Berg. First question, is it possible to set up the suspension to behave like a mid-80's ITC/Ohlins Husqvarna. In my opinion the finest rear suspension ever made. Second, I've never owned or raced anything buy 250 two strokes and am wondering what displacement I might be happy with. I like the flick factor of a 250.
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August 2nd, 2007, 09:10 AM   #23
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forks

Originally Posted by DaleEO
boheme,

If you have an 01 you have the shock with the long tapered needle. (the needle profiles have been changing yearly it seems like) With this in mind, you will need a straight rate spring, not the progressive that the bike came with. This is due to the very progressive nature of the valving caused by the long thin needle found on the 01's. In other words, as the rear suspension is compressing the shaft is encountering a larger and larger diameter needle, thereby shutting down the by pass for the oil through the shaft. At the same time the spring is becoming more and more stiff due to it's rising rate. If memory serves........... My stock shock on my 01 501 had too much compression damping (due to the rising rate spring and the valving) and too little rebound damping. Which resulted in the PA TOOIE effect. Which means getting spit off. After re-springing the bike, and re-vlaving the bike became very stable.

On my 01 501 I ran the following set up for the desert riding I do. Which by the way is not just flat & fast. 8.4KG rear spring, and 44KG front springs. And had ths suspension valved by a competent suspension man. I must respectfully disagree with Viking about having your suspension re-valved. Along with selecting the proper springs, re-valving your suspension is very important.

After re-reading this article, which I see that I posted to some time ago I have a couple of other suggestions.

I have found that 33-35 mm of static sag is really where you want to be. If with this amount of static sag you are outside of the 3 & 1/2" to 4" of rider sag there is a good chance you are going to need another spring. There is no way around it, period. Along the same lines, if the rear spring is changed then the front's will also need to be changed to maintain balance. So, check this out first before visiting the suspension shop. There is also another point to consider regarding springs, especially your shock spring. There is a certain range of spring pre load that is acceptable. It's usually 4-6mm's I believe. Mine is set at 5mm. When I got my suspension back from my tuner, I bolted them on the bike and guess what? The static sag was exactly 33mm!! So, outside of checking static and rider sag, check this. Put the bike on a stand and measure the compressed or pre-loaded lenght of the spring, then back off the adjuster so that the spring is loose and re measure and the exact same spot. Compared with your static and race sag measurements, I think you will find this rather interesting.

I don't know how fast you ride, or how many hours you ride. But experiece has taught me that 30 to 40 hours is the max you want to go before servicing your suspension fluid. Don't try and fool yourself here. Look at it this way, you change your motor oil at the suggested amount of hours or less right? Suspesion oil is no different, in fact your shock oil can reach temps approaching 400 degree's if ridden hard. The oil is asked to not only try and maintain a certain viscosity, to maintain the same damping charachteristis, but also provide lubrication as well. So don't skimp on the oil changes.

Another lesson just learned. The rebound adjuster on our shocks is a bit different than that of the KTM's. It has to be since the KTM's use a clevis for the lower mount, and our bikes use and eye. Point is, that little adjuster has a very smalll screw that water will eventually creep into and corrode. What you will notice when this happens is that the adjuster will seem like it now only has 10 clicks or so of adjustment, instead of 32. If you try and force it to adjust more it will break free, and will also break said small screw, thereby ruining it. And by ruining it I mean that you will be purchasing a new shock to the tune of $1100 usd. BEAUSE, they don't sell these parts seperately, you have to buy the whole shock. When you get your shock serviced, this piece should be dis-assembled and cleaned along with the rest of the shock to prevent this from happening.

As far as the clickers go: Your shock only has the low speed compression and rebound clickers, the forks the same. You would be well served to upgrade your forks comprssion and rebound adjuster valves to the 02 models as they flowed more oil. After having my susupension serviced by Clean racing, I have found that overall the suspension works best where he had set the clickers. I have tried playing with them a bit, a few clicks this way or that, and have always come back to the setting he gave me. That's what you're paying for when you have someone who knows what he's doing set up your suspension.
how do I get in touch with that guy who did your forks and shock???

Sethro
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March 8th, 2008, 08:54 AM   #24
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All sounds good advice. Now..during a spot of routine maintenance, I thought I'd check the sag etc...here's the results.

02 FE501 road legal (knobblies).

5'8" 88kg fully kitted.

Static sag 655mm - 600mm = 55mm Too much ???

Riding sag 600mm - 535mm = 65mm Too little ???

I cant see any markings on my spring, so the next stage is to take the whole assembly off;
Check & re set the pre load.
Probably put a softer spring on / which one and can I do this myself without special tools??
Cant find any torque setting for re-fitting the shock in the manual.

Do these numbers make sense to anyone ie ..you definately need a new spring ...or that seems ok, just adjust the preload.

I don't compete, just a little green lane / roadwork & ocassional MX or enduro track (although I'd like to do more), so do I really need to do anything...if it aint broke , leave it alone.

My feet (toes) just reach the ground - have fallen off static when stopped on a small hump..oops.

What do you think.
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March 8th, 2008, 11:04 AM   #25
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55 and 65 make 120mm and on the pre '03s they recommended 100 to 115mm. after that they recommended 85-100mm due to the steeper head angle on those machines. i would wind the spring up by a full turn if not 1.5 turns. get as near to 100mm as you can. you will have a stiffer spring so let off the compression clicker by some 4 clicks or so....

i would always run the HSCD on the full in position as it needs it.

having seen you ride arkley. i know that some of this may not work for where you are but it is in the long run - WHERE YOU NEED TO BE!!!!!!

regards

Taffy
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March 8th, 2008, 11:55 AM   #26
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OK, Cheers Taff;

I really am a tw#t sometimes....Having read your post & then RE-READ the manual, I see that the 90 - 100mm Riding sag is taken from the unsupported mm & not the unladen mm as I was thinking, and so where I was thinking that my settings were too hard - they are in fact too soft.

NOTE for anyone else who doesn't read manuals properly..measure distance with back wheel off ground / then fully laden with rider kitted out - this should be (c)100mm as Taffy's post above.

And finally.....HSCD??? guess this High Speed Compression Damping ??(page 17). So therefore turn the damper top central screw (low speed C damper) anti clockwise by another 4 clicks. Wind the outer hex nut (HSCD) clockwise fully to it's stop ?? even though the manual recommends "turn it back out by 1 - 2.5 turns??

Cheques in the post.
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March 8th, 2008, 03:33 PM   #27
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correct. forget the manual. when they wrote that they didn't know that the needle husaberg were going to use wouldn't be long/good enough.

regards

Taffy
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March 9th, 2009, 07:47 AM   #28
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RE: Re: A guide to basic suspension tuning

my personal way of setting my suspension goes like this i always look to see how much travel is left in the bottomof the fork leg and if you've got 3/4" left 100mm your forks are a little stiff and if i get forearm pump i assiociate that with the compresion being to firm if i get pump up in my hands the rebound is to hard/slow and the rear i just feel for harshness if it's harsh i start to soften the compresion till i find a smoother ride
some people find it easy to dial in the bike most people myself included are forever trying to find a better setup my new berg feels very good up to now hopefully i wont have to pay for a revalve
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March 10th, 2009, 03:02 AM   #29
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RE: Re: A guide to basic suspension tuning

FWIW the most important thing I learnt since changing suspension around isn't how to revalve a shock but how to get the front and rear of a bike working together over the widest possible range of conditions for a given set of valving

need consider how the rear influences the front in breaking bumps etc and vice versa. a lot of time can be wasted adjusting the forks to accomodate a problem the rear is casuing.

if the bike cradles nicely over all bumps at all speeds without the front ever fighting the rear or vice versa its a lot nicer to ride.

not sure how to word a step by step on it. maybe viking or dave can do one.
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March 10th, 2009, 09:07 PM   #30
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Setup is always dictated by the terrain and conditions and those are fairly universal
some bikes likes more of one thing than others
if you ride were it is going to be muddy and ruts the bike is going to track better with
the forks down in the triple clamps and the sag set in the middle of range keep in mind
that mud accumulates so sag changes once the race is under way screw in compression
both ends as much you can stand it will get softer the aim is to have stable bike and not
drag the foot pegs
if you ride were were is snow,cold and ruts setup similar to a mud setup, fork down in
triple clamps sag set at max soften compression more so in the fork (fork oil gets thick in
cold temps ) aim is to have a stable bike that kill you in choppy ruts
if you ride were it is hard pack and tight fork up in the clamps sag close to min. compression stiff enough so it does not wallow and soft enough so it is not hacky
if the bike feels unstable increase sag
this is to focus what you want out of the bike in different conditions

later VIKING
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