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February 23rd, 2008, 02:18 AM   #11
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on a newly pressed together husaberg crank:

How much extra end float should you allow for crank flex and settling during initial running?

My 650 end float decreased by 0.1mm sometime in the first 10 hours.

so If i'd set it up for 0.3mm float initially and 0.2 was too small then I'd have a problem

just curious

on the size of the press: while a small press will have enough tonnage to move the pin, you need a very ridgid frame to minimise distortion of the press. a little bendy press will load up and then make the pin jump 3 -4mm, not good for precision, a bigger press only jumps a tiny ammount or not at all, just creaking a little as the pin goes in so it can be controlled and directed as needed.
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February 23rd, 2008, 04:34 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Taffy
soeone told me that if you need more than 20 tons you are distorting the metal and it will be LESS LESS strong....
I think that would depend on the specific metal being used and its inherent properties, including design tolerances. It is probably a good rule for certain crankshafts but ideally you need to know which ones.

Cheers,
Simon
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February 23rd, 2008, 07:22 AM   #13
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the berg is alive! it runs fine and the vibration from the engine , if anything is less than it was originally , it does seem a little more torquey than it was before and less violent but this is probably due to the half link in the timing chain altering the timing slightly , allthough it could be due to the increased length of the conrod.

but it works and i will keep you informed as to how long it lasts.

regards

scrap
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February 23rd, 2008, 10:17 AM   #14
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going back to the pressing matter , i do know there is 5 thou pinch on the crank pin on the berg ,all pins are case hardened carbon steel,
have you ever tried pressing a non hardened pin into a crank web, the result is that the metal on the pin gathers up and you don't have a hope in
hell of ballancing it because it ends up all skew wiff (taffy will translate lol)

i tried this with the ktm pin after machining each side of the pin down to 30mm and leaving 35mm in the center , but of course the pin is'nt hard all the way through, it's only case hardened , and i had a very dissapointing wonky crank .

regards

scrap
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February 23rd, 2008, 04:11 PM   #15
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I thought "how long is that wonky thing going to last?" then read back to where you used the 30 x 35 inner ring. Sounds like a good solution. Did you grind a small hole through for oiling? How true did you get the crank ends running on assembly? Did you have to nudge it after it was together?

(I read skew wiff as skew off, close enough)
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February 23rd, 2008, 05:10 PM   #16
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worst crank i ever did was a mid 70's ossa on a 20 ton press. i thought the crossbar base was bending. it had me worried enough that something would pop that i used a piece of plywood as a scattershield. jap cranks came apart and went together like butter. ktm (at the time they were pentons) cranks were somewhere in between.
i'm curious how you guys line up the crankhalves nowadays since i haven't done one for a while. we used to align it using barstock on both sides as it was pressed together and after proper side clearances were set, removed it to measure runout at the end of the shafts and tune it up by holding the rod and whacking the crankwheel with a brass hammer. crude but effective. how do the real mechanics of today do it?
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February 23rd, 2008, 07:12 PM   #17
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The repair manual shows a crank assembly jig. Probably an expensive tool. I think the average rider/mechanic would just install a new crank.
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February 24th, 2008, 01:51 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Neil_E.
I thought "how long is that wonky thing going to last?" then read back to where you used the 30 x 35 inner ring. Sounds like a good solution. Did you grind a small hole through for oiling? How true did you get the crank ends running on assembly? Did you have to nudge it after it was together?

(I read skew wiff as skew off, close enough)

no small hole for oiling ,the berg crank does'nt originally have one, the oiling holes are in the crank webs and the oil is foced through these small holes by the rotation of the crank, directly onto the side of the big end bearing,

yes i had to nudge the crank slightly , but if you press the crank together carefully using a straight edge on the crank webs then you are normally around 3 or 4 thou out before you nudge the crank and dial it in properly.

i managed to get the crank to 1.5 thou runout, plenty close enough.

regards

scrap
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February 24th, 2008, 01:57 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by ned37
worst crank i ever did was a mid 70's ossa on a 20 ton press. i thought the crossbar base was bending. it had me worried enough that something would pop that i used a piece of plywood as a scattershield. jap cranks came apart and went together like butter. ktm (at the time they were pentons) cranks were somewhere in between.
i'm curious how you guys line up the crankhalves nowadays since i haven't done one for a while. we used to align it using barstock on both sides as it was pressed together and after proper side clearances were set, removed it to measure runout at the end of the shafts and tune it up by holding the rod and whacking the crankwheel with a brass hammer. crude but effective. how do the real mechanics of today do it?

i do it just the same as you (old school)

but i think they put new cranks between three hydraulic rollers .

regards

scrap
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February 24th, 2008, 02:04 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Neil_E.
The repair manual shows a crank assembly jig. Probably an expensive tool. I think the average rider/mechanic would just install a new crank.

the average mechanic would replace the rod, or they are no mechanic,

a complete crank is very expensive

i am a mechanic and an average mechanic could'nt afford a new crank lol.

thats why my crank has got a ktm rod .

regards

scrap
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