Husaberg
Go Back   Husaberg Forum > Mechanical and Technical > Mechanical

Mechanical Mechanical Forum - spinning bits and gyrating bobs


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
December 6th, 2004, 04:43 PM   #1
eon
Member
 
Joined: Feb 2002
From: Brisbane Australia

Posts: 88
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
New cam chain causing slow cranking?

Hi all,
Since installing the new follower bearings and new cam chain the starter struggles to turn the motor over. I first thought the valve clearances had loosened due to settling in etc but ther're OK, the only thing that I can think is that the (slightly) different valve timing due to the new chain has amplified the effects of normal wear of the the decomp lifter, does this sound right?

Ian
eon is offline  
 
December 6th, 2004, 11:34 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Joined: Nov 2001
From: Ely, England

Posts: 15,835
Thanks: 470

I Ride: Husaberg FE501e 2003
needs a good run eon i think. if not you may have got the cam timing wrong at one of two places. the first is the gears in the sidecover. use a ruler and squint yer eye to check this.

next is the cam and to do this you need to look at the engine timing marks through the inspection hole. get the first mark 10mm to the left of the marker and that means the 2nd one will be 5mm past the marker. this is as good as dammit TDC.

take the rocker cover off and both cam lobes should be like mickey mouses ears and level with the cylinder head (not the workshop floor!).

you'll be one (half) tooth out somewhere. as lineweaver has said the gears in the sidecover represent half a tooth (or mistake!) whilst the camwheel speaks for itself.

good luck!

regards

Taffy
Taffy is offline  
December 7th, 2004, 04:32 PM   #3
eon
Member
 
Joined: Feb 2002
From: Brisbane Australia

Posts: 88
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
Taffy,
What I did was attach the new chain to the old one and feed it through then with the timing marks aligned for TDC on the flywheel I positioned the cam sprocket (lobes up) so the screw holes were vertcally in line with the cylinder. I haven't messed with the gears inside the cover so they should be good. Should be straight forward right?

Ian
eon is offline  
December 7th, 2004, 05:33 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Joined: Nov 2001
From: Ely, England

Posts: 15,835
Thanks: 470

I Ride: Husaberg FE501e 2003
....and then you may have fitted the tensioner, the cam rolled slightly back whereas it may have been tilted slightly forward when you dismantled.

difficult to feed a chain on with the cam in situ-bitch infact-i'm afraid i shall have to ask you to accompany your bike back into the garage sir!

sorry!
Taffy is offline  
December 7th, 2004, 05:36 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Joined: Feb 2003
From: Corona California

Posts: 141
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
chain

You are going to need to remove your camchain tensioner and reset it as it snapped out for your old chain. Do not try to run it in,you will wear out the chain guide!
coronaberg is offline  
December 8th, 2004, 07:30 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Simon's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
From: Berkshire, England

Posts: 1,453
Thanks: 3

I Ride:
For what it's worth I would go back and install the cam at TDC with the lobes pointing downwards and check the timing from there. At least then you are working from TDC on the compression stroke.

It is quite easy to slip a tooth or two on the shaft when feeding the camchain round so it is always worth having the clutch casing off to correct any problems there. In addition, you then also have the engine timing marks as good timing indicators, not just the flywheel.

Cheers,
Simon
Simon is offline  
December 8th, 2004, 11:35 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Joined: Nov 2001
From: Ely, England

Posts: 15,835
Thanks: 470

I Ride: Husaberg FE501e 2003
simon

once in every two the timing gears do line up!!!!!

and if you do put the cam in with the lobes down-where is your visual on that and especially when he puts the cam cover back on!!!

not your best one there mate

Taffy
Taffy is offline  
December 8th, 2004, 03:39 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Simon's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
From: Berkshire, England

Posts: 1,453
Thanks: 3

I Ride:
Well Taffy, perhaps sometime you should try being a little less sure that only Taffy knows the way

I don't want to start an "I'm better than you" thread but I've
changed and re-timed a fair few Husaberg camshafts, not only on my two engines but others too. I kind of suspect I've probably done it a fair few times more than you have.........

I any case, nobody needs to rely on my advice alone - just read the Husaberg workshop manual - even that says install the cam with the lobes pointing downwards.

As for visuals, you should look a little closer Taffy, they're there and more than obvious enough for anyone to use (accurately)

And for those who are less initiated in timing their engines, and in my humble opinion, always time the engine up with all the timing marks in place at tdc on the compression stroke. At least then all the markers are in place and you know exactly where you started.

It's a free world though and anyone's free to do it how they want

Cheers,
Simon
Simon is offline  
December 9th, 2004, 01:38 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Joined: Nov 2001
From: Ely, England

Posts: 15,835
Thanks: 470

I Ride: Husaberg FE501e 2003
i'm not denying your ability to get there and get the job done it's just the way you've put it. you say:

"always time the engine up with all the timing marks in place at tdc on the compression stroke"

but the timing marks always line up at TDC and it's only the compression stroke cos you fitted the cam with the lobes down and not up!

the thing husaberg are protecting you from is simply trying to cram the rocker cover on with the lobes sat at 5 to 1 (is that am or pm?) and to get around that i turn the engine one revolution and fit the said cover.

can we agree that the timing marks in the ignition side aren't actually at TDC then? neither of them? this is what you imply i'm just thinking that you've never done the D-S test.

i'm with you it's those others!

regards

Taffy
Taffy is offline  
December 9th, 2004, 04:35 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Simon's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
From: Berkshire, England

Posts: 1,453
Thanks: 3

I Ride:
Originally Posted by Taffy
"always time the engine up with all the timing marks in place at tdc on the compression stroke"

but the timing marks always line up at TDC and it's only the compression stroke cos you fitted the cam with the lobes down and not up!
Doh, of course it's the compression stroke because that's the way the cam is fitted. It is also meant as a general rule of thumb "for the less initiated" (and also some that are more initiated too ). This is good practice for any work being carried out where it's relevant.

How many people have come onto this site after having problems with engine timing because they didn't time it all up correctly - i.e. on the compression stroke - when they took the bleedin engine apart?

Originally Posted by Taffy
can we agree that the timing marks in the ignition side aren't actually at TDC then? neither of them?
We can indeed. I never use the marks on the ignition side to set tdc, not even to do a valve adjustment.

Originally Posted by Taffy
this is what you imply i'm just thinking that you've never done the D-S test.
I'm not implying anything of the sort. I was actually suggesting, if you read my first post, using the engine timing marks as good timing indicators, probably because that's exactly what they are

If, what you mean by D-S is the dead stop method you'd be wrong. You make a lot of assumptions, often incorrectly so.

Cheers,
Simon
Simon is offline  
Reply

  Husaberg Forum > Mechanical and Technical > Mechanical

Tags
cam, causing, chain, cranking, slow



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hard cranking and dies when throttle is not open. 2008 FE450 matikrimerman Mechanical 4 May 5th, 2012 12:04 PM
Radiator Braces Causing Overheating Issue??? duckracer Husaberg 7 June 8th, 2010 08:07 PM
slow rider (very slow..) matikrimerman Husaberg 8 August 23rd, 2009 11:46 PM
NGK Iridium causing missfire under load? Freaky Mechanical 12 June 1st, 2008 09:17 AM
spark in relation to cranking speed. sara Mechanical 24 May 12th, 2007 03:03 AM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed