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December 27th, 2008, 06:28 AM   #1
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Preparing for salt and sand riding...

Going to take my brand new 2006 Berg on it's first ride and it will be a week of sand beaches, salt water, dunes, trails and dirt roads.
I am quite concerned about the short and long term effects of exposure to salt water.
Any helpful suggestions? I was thinking of spraying the inside of the frame with some kind of oil or undercoating...fire away I am all ears.
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December 27th, 2008, 07:11 AM   #2
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RE: Preparing for salt and sand riding...

Sounds like you're going to have a blast.

Took my boy to the beach on his well oiled & maintained bicycle - got home late so put bike in shed to wash on following weekend. 1 week later the wheels were all rusty & the chain had become rusted solid. Couldn't believe it happened so quick. Had to get 2 renches on each chain link to free up.

Next time (bike or motorbike) I'd power wash each day & silicon spray all over at end of event.
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December 27th, 2008, 12:35 PM   #3
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RE: Preparing for salt and sand riding...

Yeah, jet wash daily to remove all the salt & sand. Sand of course is abrasive, and you should keep on top of it by removing daily, especially around moving parts. Salt is a form of chloride (sodium chloride), and chlorides are responsible for the local breakdown of passive (corrosion resistant) surface films on metals, (e.g. stainless steel will corrode in the presence of chlorides). Additionally, chloride ions in the water make it more conductive, so the corrosion process occurrs at an excellerated rate.

I would also recommend keeping the chain/sprockets cleaned/oiled etc & lots of WD40/oild mist sprays where possible.

Upon completion of the event, an extra thorough version of the above should be carried out, strip chain/solvent bath/oil etc, and give th bike a good service.

Hope this helps.

Crispin
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December 27th, 2008, 03:21 PM   #4
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I'd also dismantle the bike first and pack every space with grease, eg behind the wheel bearing seals, swing arm pivot etc etc. If grease is in there, it makes id harder for contaminants to get in there, and even if they do, they still have to work through the grease layer to get to the bearing/bolt etc.

Its seems like a pain to have to do it on a new bike, but the pay off is real if you plan to keep the bike more than 6 months. Not just Bergs, but any dirt bike IMHO.

Enjoy
Steve
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December 27th, 2008, 04:26 PM   #5
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I wonder how well this product would work in your situation?
http://www.counteractrust.com/counte...htm#Motorcycle
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December 27th, 2008, 06:59 PM   #6
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All great idea's posted here, especially packing the area's behind the wheel seals with grease, if there is no empty space then there is no where for something to get into.

The swing arm is hollow and even though there are plugs with O rings,water still gets in. So, you need to make a drain on the bottom of the swing arm in front of the chain block. Pull the plug on each side of the swing arm for the shock mounting bolt and, using a tywrap or other flexible device that is TOO long for you to drop inside, measure the distance from the access hole back to where the swing arm is solid. Come forward just enough to clear that solid area and drill a small hole on the bottom of the swing arm on each side to all the water some place to drain from and the air to get into to dry it. When returning home flush out this area to remove the salt.

Remove your rear axle chain tensioner bolts and coat them liberally with anti seize compound too.

Put a drop of a good penetrating oil like Kroil on each spoke nipple thread before and after you go.

As Steve mentioned about the grease earlier, I would pull the swing arm pivot axle and apply a good coat of anti seize compound to the axle and inner bearing sleeves as well as the inserts in the cases to keep your swing arm axle from becoming one with those parts. IMHO I think that anti seize is better than grease for this application. Same goes with the wheel axles too. But, would use only water proof grease behind the wheel seals. Try and make sure you don't leave any grease on the outside if possible as the sand will stick to it.

If you are going to be riding in the salt water a lot, then I would pull at least one vent tube from the carb up on to the frame some where so when you run through the water the vent tubes will not be trying to pull water in. You can also do what I did and cut in a T fitting to each vent (there are two vents, each vent has a T so that each vent has two hoses) and run a hose up to behind the number plate and then using a little 90 degree fitting make a loop so that the end of the tube is pointing down. Also, be sure and cover the vent tubes with a rag or piece of foam and tuck them under your skid plate to keep the finest grit from entering your carb bowl through the vents. This fine grit will make it's way into the float bowl and fuel and into your motor.

If you run through a bunch of water you may want to drain the bowl once or twice to see if you are getting any water in there.

Another thing I do to my bikes is to fill the electrical connectors with die electric grease. CRC makes it in a pressurized can with a small tube for a dispenser. Pull each connection apart and fill the female side with grease and push back together, then wipe off the excess.

Use a good chain coating agent like chain wax. It dries to a non stick film and wont attract sand. Use a grunge brush to clean off the heaviest debris at the end of a ride and coat the chain liberally with chain wax and you won't have a corrosion problem there. Eventually the wax builds up a bit on the chain, but is easily removed with a rag and some WD-40 or Kroil.

Of the two anti corrosion oils mentioned, Kroil will not evaporate like WD-40. And you can get Kroil in an aerosol, AeroKroil. The only problem with either of these used int he short term is that they will attract dirt, and will hold it there. I think Motul bike wash http://volvospeed.com/Reviews/motul_motowash.html is your best bet as it cleans and leaves a light protective film. I have been using it for years with great results.

The only place where I disagree with the other posters is that I do not endorse pressure washers. Just the water pressure from a garden hose is sufficient for cleaning a bike. Pressure washers push dirt and grit into places that they shouldn't be. If you have some stubborn dirt hit it with moto wash and use a brush.
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December 27th, 2008, 09:40 PM   #7
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Great advice and thanks. Started to think I should have got an old two stroker for the job but I think with care and attention no harm will be done. I won't have any way to wash the bike for a few days as I make my way around the coastline...so just hand cleaning and not a lot of fresh water just what I will carry to drink. After that I can get to a hose easy enough. So pre ride attention is important. One would think avoiding the place would be a good idea but to tell you the truth it's the most amazing place on earth and I just have to go back there. I think I will spray the indside of the frame with some heated chain oil or something sticky like that.
I won't be driving through salt water but it's always just under the surface and will spray up everywhere from the tires of course. Maybe a few river crossings in Brackish (mixed) water but at low tide they should be mostly fresh water, and shouldnt be a problem.
Dale E O what are you talking for a drill hole? Like an 1/8th bit? Cheers.
Not sure if this is going to work but this is my intended playground.
http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&q=rose ... 3&t=h&z=11
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December 29th, 2008, 01:11 PM   #8
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Yeah, all sounds good.

Pressure washers...do or don't???

After a muddy session in a clay area - dirt is caked & compacted into hard to reach areas - between skid pate & frame etc. I use a (cheap - and therefore low powered I assume) washer and keep it moving - don't linger anywhere (other than inside the mud guards etc) as it will strip your lubricants and definately be careful of wheel bearings / head / swing arm etc, but on balance I figure sensible usage is better than progressive crud build up.

What do you think??
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December 29th, 2008, 01:24 PM   #9
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I suppose I should have been more explicit in the advice. The warning must always be attached to HP jet washers to avoid bearings etc, even radiator fins can get ripped to shreds if you’re not careful. They have a very practical use, but you must use them carefully & sensibly.
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December 29th, 2008, 01:25 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by arkley123
Yeah, all sounds good.

Pressure washers...do or don't???

After a muddy session in a clay area - dirt is caked & compacted into hard to reach areas - between skid pate & frame etc. I use a (cheap - and therefore low powered I assume) washer and keep it moving - don't linger anywhere (other than inside the mud guards etc) as it will strip your lubricants and definately be careful of wheel bearings / head / swing arm etc, but on balance I figure sensible usage is better than progressive crud build up.

What do you think??
I can see your point of view, especially in light of a fully caked bike after a ride through the gumbo. However, I still feel that even one misplaced blast of 1600psi water will force water and grit to where you don't want it, even if you are trying really hard to keep from doing it. Case in point would be the weep hole for the water pump, one blast there and you just shove water and grit into the area between the seals for it to sit there and grind away. Even the owner's manual states not to use a pressure washer on your bike.

When I am faced with that situation, I just keep rinsing the bike with the pressure availble from the hose, around 70psi?, and use a plastic spatchula to remove the heaviest of the crud.

Very respectfully submitted,

Dale
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