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September 27th, 2014, 10:37 AM   #1
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Tips and tricks for rides

Might be interesting to have a thread for various tips and tricks to know out in the field -

Maybe everyone knows these but I hadn't heard of them until I'd heard of them

The group ride veterans here have some tricks up their sleeves. One is to always carry JB-Weld or similar reinforced epoxy to be able to heal bashed covers etc.

This one's basic - Also a liter plus of oil and a spark plugs to fit all bikes so that they can be drained and run again in the event of a failed water crossing.

Another oldschool thing I heard about was to have a "ghost" in the wheel - a draugur they call it here - where there are two tubes in the tire. One deflated sitting and a second one that's inflated as normal. If you puncture then the second tube is inflated and you continue riding, no tire change required ... The idle one serves as some protection too. Not sure how the valve stem is arranged or which one is on inside. (I'd guess that the flat one sits near the wheel and its valve stem pokes out through a rimlock hole or a dedicated drilled hole, and the tube is pushed to the side to make room for the inflated tube's valve stem.)

Vise-Grips can be used as makeshift clutch, brake, and gear levers if they don't break too badly.

Some guys keep spare clutch/brake levers ziptied to the handlebars, tucked away kind of behind the headlight mask or similar.

A loop of heavy-duty weave nylon ribbon fastened in a loop around the seat is good to grab when picking the bike up out of hairy landings.

When towing a bike, fix the rope to the footpegs. Offset - left side on one bike, right side on the other. No knot on the rear bike, only a loop around the footpeg that's kept in place by the rider standing on it. If something goes wrong, you lift the foot and the rope falls off which can help in scary situations.
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September 27th, 2014, 01:32 PM   #2
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The quick metal is good, I usually take some sand paper as well. A goggle rag in a zip lock bag, also can be used for drying out air box/ wet filters.

If you're carrying one spare tube make it a front one it will fit both wheels.

I try to do most Maintenance work out of my bum bag, this way I know I carry the required tools.

Wire, zip ties, tape and a small selection of fasteners come with me.

Some 70 degree owners have made themselves small jumper leads.

I run PC filter skins as well, a) extra filtration b) if the dust prevails I can simply yank the skin and start over with a fresh fIlter.

I take lotsa water too, at least 3 liters and my telephone in a zip lock bag as well.
Split link for your chain and mini breaker, a fuse or two for the electric bike don't hurt either.
Thanks from bushmechanic, tourist and rens bos
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September 28th, 2014, 12:06 AM   #3
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Well i can only ad to this, a man is never to old to learn
It looks like a digital version of the column that Malcolm Smith, Dick Burleson wrote in Dirtbike or Dirtrider magazine.
So let it keep coming, these tips are very useful

Grtz Rens
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September 28th, 2014, 12:40 AM   #4
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take a 20" spare tube and it'll do both wheels...........

Taffy
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September 28th, 2014, 02:09 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by rens bos View Post
Well i can only ad to this, a man is never to old to learn
It looks like a digital version of the column that Malcolm Smith, Dick Burleson wrote in Dirtbike or Dirtrider magazine.
So let it keep coming, these tips are very useful

Grtz Rens

Now that's what i could do with when i get stuck, a ten second shot of their riding ability to get me out of trouble.
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September 28th, 2014, 05:10 AM   #6
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Yo! Plumbbob,
Please let me know if works out, that 10 second "shot",every time i tried to think of their riding tip, i kissed the ground

Grtz Rens
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September 28th, 2014, 06:24 AM   #7
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Jup. Got stuck, remembered seeing Graham Jarvis doing his stuff, got a bruise on my hand and a face full of mud.
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September 28th, 2014, 07:08 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by makazica View Post
Jup. Got stuck, remembered seeing Graham Jarvis doing his stuff, got a bruise on my hand and a face full of mud.
The ten second shot is supposed to get you out of trouble not into more trouble
You should also only use it if someone is filming;
You could look really good if it works......or you can give us all a laugh if it doesn't
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September 28th, 2014, 08:15 AM   #9
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Some of my friends have a soft sponge cloth in their helmets. No sweat running down the face and easy to squeeze dry when you take a break.

Instead of water in the camelbak use mineral water and apple juice 50-50. Cheap good sports drink.

Use panty hoses over the radiator guards when it's really muddy. The mud falls off leaving the radiators free for air.

Use single layer goggle lens without any ventilation and put some vaseline on the foam next to the skin when driving in very dry and dusty conditions. That will keep the dust out from the eyes. Use a vaseline that doesnt irritate the skin....
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Last edited by jon andersson; September 28th, 2014 at 08:19 AM.
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September 28th, 2014, 10:10 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by jon andersson View Post
Some of my friends have a soft sponge cloth in their helmets. No sweat running down the face and easy to squeeze dry when you take a break.

Instead of water in the camelbak use mineral water and apple juice 50-50. Cheap good sports drink.

Use panty hoses over the radiator guards when it's really muddy. The mud falls off leaving the radiators free for air.

Use single layer goggle lens without any ventilation and put some vaseline on the foam next to the skin when driving in very dry and dusty conditions. That will keep the dust out from the eyes. Use a vaseline that doesnt irritate the skin....

That's some gold right there, thanks dude ! ( where do I find the thanks button when using my ifail ?)
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