Husaberg
Go Back   Husaberg Forum > Mechanical and Technical > Fuel

Fuel Fuel Delivery


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
January 8th, 2007, 07:14 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2006
From: townsville australia

Posts: 174
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
how do I know how lean is too lean

I have just installed a Haltech AFR meter (Air Fuel Ratio) on my '03 fe400. I have an exhaust leak where the headers join the middle piece wich will be giving me a false reading but that will be rectified very shortly and before I play with my carbie.

The AFR on Idle is reading spot on stoich (14:1) but as soon as the throttle is touched the slightest bit the AFR reads off the chart on the rich side. My dilema is I only get about 140 km to a tank and my zorst is covered in black soot at the muffler tip (and at the leak). I have perfect throttle responce when it's warm but it's really sucking the fuel.

I realise a rich mix will keep the engine cooler and the average temperatures here are 20 deg celcius in winter and about 30-35 in summer so a cooler running bike is helpful. But what will the bike do when it's too lean at WOT (Wide Open Throttle) before it destroys itself?

do I look for stalling, backfireing......?

please help.
ferret is offline  
 
January 9th, 2007, 02:08 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2006
From: Hayle Cornwall

Posts: 987
Thanks: 22

I Ride:
Re: how do I know how lean is too lean

Hi Ferret,

To do this correctly you will have to put it on the dyno to get the correct readings under load. The only thing you can set is the idle and from what you have said this seems to be OK.

You could set the main jet by just looking at the colour but if you get it on the dyno you can see what is happening at any throttle opening and RPM.
But if you havn't got access to a dyno then all you can do is set it up by the seat of your pants. Failing that you might find some settings in the owner's doc what other people have found to be successful.

Regards

Sparks.
sparks is offline  
January 9th, 2007, 01:16 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2006
From: townsville australia

Posts: 174
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
good point I forgot about a dyno. I have access to a car dyno, will that work the same?

We usually tune cars in 2nd or 3rd but what geat do ya dyno a bike in? will the knobblies work on there?



could be a fact finding mission this arvo.
ferret is offline  
January 9th, 2007, 02:28 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Joined: Nov 2001
From: Ely, England

Posts: 15,701
Thanks: 452

I Ride: Husaberg FE501e 2003
Ferret

when lean they seem gutless from certain revs up. yes it revs but it doesn't accelerate the revs with any speed and therefore pull.

i can't understand why you can't try one then the next. is it really such a hard job to do? 500 yards round a field?

regards

Taffy
Taffy is offline  
January 9th, 2007, 02:48 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2006
From: townsville australia

Posts: 174
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
Originally Posted by Taffy
Ferret

when lean they seem gutless from certain revs up. yes it revs but it doesn't accelerate the revs with any speed and therefore pull.

regards

Taffy
sweet that's the spot on answer I was hoping for as I have a paddock about 1km long wich I use for checking things.

thanks mate.
ferret is offline  
January 11th, 2007, 01:08 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
LINEAWEAVER's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
From: El Sobrante, Ca. 94803

Posts: 3,249
Thanks: 1

I Ride:
Unfortunately what you have purchased is a "Narrow Band" O2 Sensor kit which shall be of little value. Said sensors are only accurate over a very narrow range near 14.7:1 AFR.

Sorry.

Dale
LINEAWEAVER is offline  
January 11th, 2007, 01:58 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2006
From: townsville australia

Posts: 174
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
actually it's the wide band designed for petrol, methanol, deisel and lpg. I'll try get a pic for ya.


here's the job, comes with a wide band O2 sensor otherwise if going on a car you can use the standard narrow band O2 sensor.

Haltuner
The new Haltuner is a fast and easy way to visualize the tuning of your car. Using your built in O2 sensor or one provided in the kit, you can display the current reading on the Haltuners 30 LED display. With the Haltuner hooked up to your car, you can see the results of the cars computer in real time.







The display is divided up into three sections representing lean, stoic and rich. The colours change to indicate which section you are in. Each section has 10 LEDs to provide a useful reading of your O2 sensor.
Attached Thumbnails
how do I know how lean is too lean-haltuner1.jpg  
ferret is offline  
January 12th, 2007, 08:31 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
LINEAWEAVER's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
From: El Sobrante, Ca. 94803

Posts: 3,249
Thanks: 1

I Ride:
Originally Posted by ferret
actually it's the wide band designed for petrol, methanol, deisel and lpg. I'll try get a pic for ya.


here's the job, comes with a wide band O2 sensor otherwise if going on a car you can use the standard narrow band O2 sensor.

Haltuner
The new Haltuner is a fast and easy way to visualize the tuning of your car. Using your built in O2 sensor or one provided in the kit, you can display the current reading on the Haltuners 30 LED display. With the Haltuner hooked up to your car, you can see the results of the cars computer in real time.







The display is divided up into three sections representing lean, stoic and rich. The colours change to indicate which section you are in. Each section has 10 LEDs to provide a useful reading of your O2 sensor.
Insure a minimum of "Five" wires come from the O2 sensor. The four wire units are sold as an encoded wide band and remain inaccurate over a wide range, just the same they are reffered to as "Widew band".

If you paid lerss than $450.00 US it is likely the impostor.

My Autronic system was near $1800.00 US, The DynoJet near $500.00.

In any event, do not tune for the instrument, tune for performance then confirm with an accurate instrument. If you trust your instrument, you now have a reference.

Hope this helps.

Best Regards,
Dale
LINEAWEAVER is offline  
January 14th, 2007, 01:44 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Joined: Sep 2006
From: townsville australia

Posts: 174
Thanks: 0

I Ride:
yeah we also have the flashy version we use when tuning cars, I think it was $650 but yeah mine is only for an indication not exact measurements but when they read off the scale ya know it's a little rich . I'll keep ya updated as we chewed thru all our gas on the mig making some turbo manifolds for a couple cars (including my turbo V8 Gemini). So when the next bottle comes (hopefully today) I'll weld the pipes together and see how she reads.
ferret is offline  
January 15th, 2007, 08:53 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
LINEAWEAVER's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
From: El Sobrante, Ca. 94803

Posts: 3,249
Thanks: 1

I Ride:
Originally Posted by ferret
yeah we also have the flashy version we use when tuning cars, I think it was $650 but yeah mine is only for an indication not exact measurements but when they read off the scale ya know it's a little rich . I'll keep ya updated as we chewed thru all our gas on the mig making some turbo manifolds for a couple cars (including my turbo V8 Gemini). So when the next bottle comes (hopefully today) I'll weld the pipes together and see how she reads.
Hi Ferret,
Am I then to assume you were indeed using a four wire "Wide-Band" ?

Thank's
Dale
LINEAWEAVER is offline  
Reply

  Husaberg Forum > Mechanical and Technical > Fuel

Tags
lean



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FE450 very lean mixture BergHusa Fuel 2 May 1st, 2012 05:16 AM
09FE 450 running very lean BRN2RDE Fuel 16 April 3rd, 2010 07:20 AM
Nice lean angle... Maddel SuperMoto 23 December 22nd, 2008 07:01 PM
04 mod husa 650,the fuel mixture is to lean,what to do? viper Fuel 6 September 27th, 2006 01:01 PM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed